Aunt Beulah’s Recommendations for Living Well

and some who modeled them for me

1. Nurture your body and mind
A California girl strode into my classroom and introduced herself as the teacher next door. Blonde and athletic, Barbara became my best friend and reacted with disbelief when she learned I didn’t exercise. “Not even speed walking? You don’t own a bike?” Within a year, I purchased running shoes and drove to an abandoned railroad grade outside of town. Knowing from Barbara that cardio conditioning requires continuous movement, I decided to run 30 minutes. New to pacing, I sprinted up the grade, then lurched up the grade, then vomited on the grade. But I didn’t quit.


2. Indulge in laughter and small pleasures

Mr. Hall, the janitor at my elementary school, carried laughter and peppermints in the pockets of his bib overalls to share with students in need. Every day, he sprinkled sunshine among us; as a result, most of my class decided to be janitors when we grew up — so we could have as much fun as he did.

3. Cherish your loved ones and friends
As I explained in my first post, when Aunt Beulah hugged me tight and listened, she did more than stifle my sobs: she demonstrated her love for me in an understated way that bound me to her forever. And she never mentioned the mess I made of her apron front with my blubbering.

4. Do some good
My oldest brother played free-spirited games he created with his much younger siblings, and we adored him. That’s why we sat in the car and sobbed as he walked toward the exhaust-spewing bus that would start him on his long journey of service to his country in Korea, then to the many students he taught, followed by his more recent service to his church in China, Laos and South Africa. Now 80, he serves the dying as a hospice chaplain, and my experience tells me that he serves them with understanding and generosity.

5, Utilize your talents and skills
When I called my mother of 78 on a Sunday afternoon, we talked about the speech she had given in church that morning; and she described her latest project: a chest she refinished and painted with graceful red poppies. She planned to take  it on Monday to the artist’s co-op where she sold her crafts. A few days after our conversation, she died. I sat in my living room, surrounded by cherished items she made for me, and wept.

Parents at Hoover Dam

My parents in front of the dam Dad helped build.

6. Develop financial fitness
My dad worked in the depths of the Hoover Dam, the gold mines of California, and the iron-ore tunnels of Utah. At 35, fearing miner’s lung, he went to work at an iron mill in the fiery heat of a blast furnace. When laid-off or on strike, he took any job he could to prevent “going on the dole,” which he considered more demeaning than bucking bales in another man’s field or cleaning coops at a neighbor’s chicken farm. And always, he saved, avoided debt, and made double house payments whenever possible. Every time I buy something I want, rather than need, I sense him shaking his head in dismay.

Have some thoughts
about your role models for aging well?
I’d be interested.
Please comment.

Recap of last week’s comments
Janice wrote that retirement should be about pursuing any dreams you put on hold when younger; Jeannie wishes she had abandoned her dream of being taller by wearing 4-5 inch heels that eventually did her harm. Kathleen senses retirement looming, but admits she’s a grasshopper. Sue fretted about pursuing too many interests too briefly, even as she understood that her varied interests helped her teach well. Dawna was flooded by memories of her loved ones and thinks she should start planning now in order to age well.

As I read your comments, I appreciated the spirit and personality evident in each response. Thank you.

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8 thoughts on “Aunt Beulah’s Recommendations for Living Well

  1. Since you have started this blog, there have been a lot of thoughts running through my head about aging well, and liking it. I enjoyed your 6 recommendations. Not only are they thoughts that I have been having, but they hit home and make it easier to focus.

    I too sat among things that Grandma had given me and wept. Still do. One of my greatest desires is to be like those that went on before me, as gracefully as they were.

    Thank you Janet, for another week of some inspiring insight.

    ps… I always knew Kathleen was a grasshopper….. 🙂

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    • I’m glad the recommendations seemed relevant to you, Dawna. I thought a lot about the people who showed me the way to age and the qualities they had and tried to capture them in Aunt Beulah’s recommendations. Next, I plan to write about each of them in some depth.

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  2. Well, Aunt Beulah, I wish I’d followed some of your advice, especially #1, BEFORE I’d aged to this point! My parents also lived the depression years and learned the value of saving, with minimal debt, and every day I appreciate their example. #5 is very encouraging to me a I invest many hours making memory albums for various family members. I’ve sometimes wondered, “will they really care about any of this or does it only have meaning for me?”. I know how you treasure the many beautiful tole paintings you mother created so I think , “yeah, maybe they will”. Thank you for reminding me to just take joy in the project and let the future take care of itself.

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